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Publications in peer reviewed journals

2 Publications found
  • Application of stable-isotope labelling techniques for the detection of active diazotrophs

    Angel R, Panhölzl C, Gabriel R, Herbold C, Wanek W, Richter A, Eichorst SA, Woebken D
    2018 - Environmental microbiology, 20: 44-61


    Investigating active participants in the fixation of dinitrogen gas is vital as N is often a limiting factor for primary production. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is performed by a diverse guild of bacteria and archaea (diazotrophs), which can be free-living or symbionts. Free-living diazotrophs are widely distributed in the environment, yet our knowledge about their identity and ecophysiology is still limited. A major challenge in investigating this guild is inferring activity from genetic data as this process is highly regulated. To address this challenge, we evaluated and improved several 15N-based methods for detecting N2 fixation activity (with a focus on soil samples) and studying active diazotrophs. We compared the acetylene reduction assay and the 15N2 tracer method and demonstrated that the latter is more sensitive in samples with low activity. Additionally, tracing 15N into microbial RNA provides much higher sensitivity compared to bulk soil analysis. Active soil diazotrophs were identified with a 15N-RNA-SIP approach optimized for environmental samples and benchmarked to 15N-DNA-SIP. Lastly, we investigated the feasibility of using SIP-Raman microspectroscopy for detecting 15N-labelled cells. Taken together, these tools allow identifying and investigating active free-living diazotrophs in a highly sensitive manner in diverse environments, from bulk to the single-cell level.

  • Cultivation and genomic analysis of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus”, an obligately thermophilic, ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaeon from a hot spring biofilm in Graendalur valley, Iceland

    Daebeler A, Herbold C, Vierheilig J, Sedlacek CJ, Pjevac P, Albertsen M, Kirkegaard RH, De La Torre JR, Daims H, Wagner M
    2018 - Front Microbiol, 9: 193


    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota are the only known aerobic ammonia oxidizers in geothermal environments. Although molecular data indicate the presence of phylogenetically diverse AOA from the Nitrosocaldus clade, group 1.1b and group 1.1a Thaumarchaeota in terrestrial high-temperature habitats, only one enrichment culture of an AOA thriving above 50 °C has been reported and functionally analyzed. In this study, we physiologically and genomically characterized a newly discovered thaumarchaeon from the deep-branching Nitrosocaldaceae family of which we have obtained a high (~85 %) enrichment from biofilm of an Icelandic hot spring (73 °C). This AOA, which we provisionally refer to as “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus islandicus”, is an obligately thermophilic, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer, which stoichiometricall converts ammonia to nitrite at temperatures between 50 °C and 70 °C. “Ca. N. islandicus” encodes the expected repertoire of enzymes proposed to be required for archaeal ammonia oxidation, but unexpectedly lacks a nirK gene and also possesses no identifiable other enzyme for nitric oxide (NO) generation*. Nevertheless, ammonia oxidation by this AOA appears to be NO-dependent as “Ca. N. islandicus” is, like all other tested AOA, inhibited by the addition of an NO scavenger. Furthermore, comparative genomics revealed that “Ca. N. islandicus” has the potential for aromatic amino acid fermentation as its genome encodes an indolepyruvate oxidoreductase (iorAB) as well as a type 3b hydrogenase, which are not present in any other sequenced AOA. A further surprising genomic feature of this thermophilic ammonia oxidizer is the absence of DNA polymerase D genes – one of the predominant replicative DNA polymerases in all other ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. Collectively, our findings suggest that metabolic versatility and DNA replication might differ substantially between obligately thermophilic and other AOA.

Book chapters and other publications

2 Publications found
  • Stickstoffkreisläufe in der Abwasserreinigung - neue und bewährte Wege

    Daims H
    2018 - 31-46. in Wiener Mitteilungen Wasser-Abwasser-Gewässer, vol. 247. (Krampe, J; Kreuzinger, N)


    Der klassische Weg zur Stickstoff-Eliminierung in Kläranlagen beruht auf der Kombination von Nitrifikation und Denitrifikation. In den letzten Jahren haben molekularbiologische Methoden eine Vielzahl neuer Einblicke in die Biologie der Nitrifikanten (Ammoniak- und Nitritoxidierer) ergeben. Diese Erkenntnisse beinhalten eine unerwartet hohe Diversität dieser Bakterien, alternative Stoffwechselwege sowie komplett allein nitrifizierende Mikroben (Comammox-Organismen). Das resultierende neue Bild der Nitrifikation weicht stark vom etablierten Lehrbuchwissen ab. Ein kosten- und energieeffizienterer Weg zur Stickstoff-Eliminierung nutzt die anaerobe Ammoniumoxidation (Anammox-Prozess). Dieser Ansatz nutzt extrem langsam wachsende Bakterien und erfordert die selektive Unterdrückung bestimmter Organismen (Nitritoxidierer). Aus diesen Gründen ist der Anammox-Prozess zwar vielversprechend, die praktische Implementierung ist jedoch Gegenstand aktiver Forschungs- und Optimierungsarbeiten. Ein weiterer neuer Prozess, die nitrit-abhängige anaerobe Methanoxidation (n-damo), wird großtechnisch noch nicht eingesetzt. Insbesondere in Kombination mit Anammox könnte der n-damo Prozess zur gleichzeitigen Eliminierung von restlichem Methan und von Stickstoff interessant werden.

  • Nitrospira

    Daims H, Wagner M
    2018 - Trends Microbiol., in press


    In this infographic, the key metabolic functions of Nitrospira and the role that these bacteria play in nitrification and other processes in the environment is shown. Nitrospira plays pivotal roles in nitrification as an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium. These bacteria often occur in close association with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea that convert ammonia to nitrite, which is further oxidized to nitrate by Nitrospira. However, in 'reciprocal feeding' interactions, Nitrospira can also provide ammonia oxidizers with ammonia released from urea or cyanate, which is further nitrified as described above. Recently discovered Nitrospira members even catalyze both nitrification steps alone and are therefore called complete ammonia oxidizers or 'comammox' organisms. Some strains of Nitrospira utilize alternative substrates, such as Hand formate, using oxygen or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, and can exploit these energy sources concurrently with aerobic nitrite oxidation. This metabolic versatility enables Nitrospira to colonize a broad range of habitats and to sustain shifts in environmental conditions such as changing oxygen concentrations.

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